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The Conversation Art Podcast

A podcast that goes behind the scenes and between the lines of the contemporary art worlds, through conversations with artists, dealers, curators, and collectors--based in Los Angeles, but reaching nationally and internationally.
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The Conversation Art Podcast
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Now displaying: May, 2017
May 20, 2017

Los Angeles-based art business writer Tim Schneider, creator of­­­­­­­­ The Gray Market blog, talks about:

His nerd roots in the Midwest; "COINs," which stands for "Collectors Only In Name," who tend to be labeled villains for art flipping tendencies, as opposed to collectors such as hedge funder Steven Cohen, who 'plays by the rules' at least as perceived by gallerists, even though he's also been known to flip works himself; his Gray Market blog, which he describes as "peeling back the layers of what we can see  reported…traditionally, and asking: Why are people doing these things? What's the strategy?"; choosing between screenwriting and art for a career, and why he chose the path he chose; how he navigates the art world as a professional skeptic and somehow still get access to the inside, where some of the most useful intelligence is; the prospect of becoming "the Anthony Bourdain of the art world;" his upcoming book, "The Great Re-Framing: How Technology Will and Will Not Change the Gallery System," which he's self-publishing, because it includes time-sensitive information that can't be wasted on the overly long traditional publishing process (the book is slated to come out by June 1st, on the Amazon Kindle platform); and what it's like living in Downtown L.A. right by the Grand Central Market (directly downhill from MoCA, the Broad and Disney Concert Hall on Grand St.).

May 13, 2017

Custom framer/owner of Downing Frames Clint Downing talks about:

Starting his business out of his apartment across the street from Pratt, where he went to art school; his collaborations with artists, and how "there isn't a place that we won't go…"; how he reconciles production failures in working on new designs with delivering products that meet Downing Frames' best-of-industry standards; how he's very satisfied being behind the scenes in the art world, largely because he and his company receive a lot of gratitude for their work from customers; what it's like interacting with clients, and their staff, onsite in their homes, from the sit-down introduction to the 'shakedown' he receives from the overprotective freight elevator operators and supers, but ultimately it's about coming to the clients as an expert, and being respectful rather than subservient.

May 6, 2017

Hudson River Valley-based artist Anne Lindberg talks about:

Her relatively new (as of 2+ years) home in the Hudson River Valley, after having spent 28 years prior in Kansas City; her roots in Iowa City, where her mom was an artist and her dad taught at the University; her and her husband's decision to move from Kansas City to Ancramdale, NY, partially engineered through their pied-a-terre on the Upper West Side, which her husband moved into when he started teaching at Parsons School of Design; her unusual home and studio setting, surrounded by farms, and how the move to rural New York has been a clarifying process in terms of her priorities and the downsizing of possessions; how because of her relative remoteness, especially in relation to NYC, studio visitors need to make a day of it, between the roundtrip train ride, ride from the station, and taking a walk in the neighborhood, in addition to the studio visit itself; how the Hudson River Valley in general, though particularly its light, which she describes as both amber and seeming to come from the side, affects her work; her unique process of using a 10-foot-long architectural parallel bar on a 10-foot vertical table that raises and lowers on an electric wench; how pivotal her participation in the Omi Residency Program was for her work; and the whole world of farmers in her rural neighborhood that have opened up a new community for her.

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