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The Conversation Art Podcast

A podcast that goes behind the scenes and between the lines of the contemporary art worlds, through conversations with artists, dealers, curators, and collectors--based in Los Angeles, but reaching nationally and internationally.
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The Conversation Art Podcast
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Now displaying: December, 2017
Dec 29, 2017

Los Angeles-based sound artist-artist-musician Chris Kallmyer talks about:

Living in the El Sereno neighborhood of Los Angeles, where he and his wife just bought a house, with the objective of becoming neighborhood citizens rather than investors; how and why an artist like Chris is able to buy a house (a partner with a more stable job situation than an artist helps), and why they chose El Sereno; the freedom of being alternately a sound artist, a musician or an artist, depending on the context; the importance of hierarchy in his collaborative projects, because ultimately there needs to be a final-decision-maker in order for everyone to feel safe; his musical performances, including Paradise Choir at SF MoMA, and a cheese-tasting with musical accompaniment; some of the reactions to his experimental music/performance work, which he describes as abstract but also often involves the public; how he’s gotten his pieces performed in venues such as SF MoMA and LACMA relatively early in his career; and his side gigs to supplement his limited paid sound art gigs, including video editing for friends and playing guitar for a local touring chamber orchestra.

Dec 16, 2017

Brooklyn-based artist, activist, comedian and advertising creative director Jeff Greenspan talks about:

The contradictions between his artmaking and his day job in advertising, and how he rationalizes biting the hand that feeds, among other seeming hypocrisies, including whether he’s using himself to promote the issues, or the issues to promote himself; his social/activist projects, including “hipster traps,” “Tourist Lanes,”  “The World’s Most Exclusive Website” and “The Statue Experiment,” and how calling himself an artist is still relatively new for him; how to make a YouTube video that gets 1,000,000 views; his and frequent collaborator Andrew Tider’s epic Edward Snowden sculpture project, in which they commissioned and then placed a large bust of Snowden in a Brooklyn public park, and the rollercoaster life it took on —it was a project that cost them thousands of dollars each and ran the risk of arrest and potential harm to those who were assisting in the rogue installation; and the nuanced realities of working in advertising and particularly branding, and his and Tider’s recent project pitched to Virgin Atlantic airlines.

Dec 2, 2017

Legendary East Village gallerist Gracie Mansion talks about the various turning points in her life and career, including:  Her early days in the East Village (9th St. between 1st & Ave. A), when she had an apartment to live, and another for her studio, for about $200 total; the genesis of her first gallery, which she started out of the bathroom of that apartment, and managed to stir up a whirlwind of visitors and press; one of her day jobs, at a SoHo gallery, where her boss had her run a ‘museum’ of art by prostitutes; the changing landscape of the downtown NYC gallery world, as she moved her spaces through the East Village, later to SoHo, and then much later to Chelsea; how she learned how to price artworks from legendary dealer Leo Castelli; what it’s like to negotiate with gallery backers, and how that worked out for her; and how and why she changed her name to Gracie Mansion (the name of the New York City Mayor’s residence).

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